Chevrolet Generation I & II V6 & V8 Universal MMX Series Engine Mounts


Jeeps & Other Vehicles

Novak engine mounts have been among our flagship products for over 40 years and always popular. Our MMX series of mounts offer the most strength, adjustability, and modularity available.

Product & Features


Ease of Installation

These mounts are weld-in style and detailed instructions will guide to an ideal installation.


The Novak mounts feature thick 3/16” laser cut and CNC bent steel construction. Engineered using advanced CAD modeling and real world testing, these mounts have shown to handle even the wildest V8 with aplomb.

Vibration Isolation

Each mount kit comes with our steel reinforced high-grade urethane isolators that are specified for that ideal balance of isolation and firmness with the power of modern engines. Substantial 5/8” through bolts capture the assembly. Replacement bushing sets are available below should replacement ever be needed.


Geometry of the mounts is compact to provide clearance for all stock components including the steering shaft with its pillow block, and the recommended exhaust headers below.


The design on these mounts allows outstanding placement freedom in most any vehicle that meets the width requirements and has parallel frame channels. They have a large adjustment range for placement in the vertical, left-right offset, and longitudinal directions.

Engine Mount Finish

All parts except the frame brackets are zinc coated for resistance against corrosion. As the frame brackets are welded to the frame, any finish on the frame side brackets as well as the frame would be burned. The welded channels will need to be finished but you may enamel, powder coat or otherwise finish the bracketry and adjacent frame area to your own style.


Each mount set contains left and right frame mount sets, two sets of urethane bushings, two engine plates, along with the necessary installation hardware and instructions.

Applications & Compatibility


MMX-NC1 fits narrow framed model Jeep models including:

  • All CJ models
  • FC Series
  • Commando Models
  • Utility Trucks & Wagons
  • Other vehicles with parallel frame rails and an inside to inside frame width range of 25" - 27-1/2"

MMX-WC1 fits wide framed Jeep models including:

  • YJ Wrangler
  • FSJ Trucks, Wagoneers and Cherokees
  • Other vehicles with parallel frame rails and an inside to inside frame width range of 27-1/2" to 31"


  • Chevrolet Small Block V8, Generation I-II, 1955-1998+ (265-400, LT1, etc.)
  • Chevrolet Small Block V6, Generation I-III, 1978-2007+ (200-262, 4.3L, etc.) *
  • Chevrolet Big Block V8, 1965-2007+ (409-454, 7.4L, 8.1L, etc.) **
  • Chevrolet I6 1962-1988 (250, 292) (if factory "V" brackets are installed on the block) ***
  • Chevrolet Diesel V8 (6.2L, 1982-1993. 6.5L, 1992-1999)

Related Products

For Conventional Small Block Heads


For Angle Plug "Fast Burn" Heads

Rear Exit


Short Block Hugger


Long Block Hugger


Installation Requirements

Old Mount Removal 

Unbolting or cutting is required to remove the factory frame mounts for factory Jeep engines. This process will vary from model to model. You will want to completely remove and smooth the surface of your frame rails for a nice fitment of the new engine mount channels to your frame.


Engine placement in these applications is an effort in compromise to find the best position overall as a package. Generally the engine will be about 1” or even more towards the left, (driver’s side in the USA) away from the front differential in a CJ application. This gives the best balance of weight, and more importantly clearance, for the driveshaft going to the front axle. Your tight spots will be steering to exhaust on the left (hold that as tight as you can) and clearance for the front driveshaft on the right. On a driver’s side drop transfer case, usually the later Jeeps, things often get a little easier as steering and front driveshaft are pushing you the same direction. Fore and aft position will vary with the Jeep model and engine.

Have a CJ5 and Gen I with a rear distributor? You’ll be better off a little forward for more rear driveshaft length and clearance for that HEI. If you are in a longer Jeep and using an LS engine with no distributor, you’ll have more fan clearance and better balance if you hold it to the rear. Usually for ground clearance tuck things up nicely for height to avoid damage to oil pans and other life giving parts in the Jeep. On later Jeeps with a Driver’s side drop transfer case and front differential, things are a little easier as the steering and offset are both pushing the drivetrain to the passenger’s side. Again, that 1 to 1-1/2” dimension is usually where you want to be. Common sense and taking a step back to look at things overall goes a long way.


Driveshaft length changes are often required. Most conversions to these transmissions will require that the rear driveshaft be modified to be shorter and front driveshaft longer. Some of our customers, fearful at the perceived expense of new or modified driveshafts, attempt to let the existing driveshafts dictate engine, transmission and transfer case location, usually to the detriment of the project. Our recommendation is to always value the correct position of drivetrain components over saving a few dollars which is usually regretted in the long run with compromised positioning. Sometimes the application allows use of the existing shafts without modification. While that is perfectly acceptable, it should not be the first priority. Driveshaft modifications and rebalancing can be affordable when performed by driveline, RV or tractor implement specialists. New driveshafts are an option, but not necessarily a requirement in regards to the actual successful conversion if your existing driveshafts are in good condition. Jeeps that require extensive travel or specialty-built driveshafts have this option available through several fabricators across the nation. These are normally specified after placement of the new transmission and measured at vehicle ride height. As the rear driveline gets shorter, it is often advantageous to us a Double Cardan or “CV style” rear shaft with the correct geometry at the axle to minimize vibrations and possible binding. Novak can also accommodate your needs on this if provided with dimensions for the shafts at a reasonable rate.


Use of factory axles is completely acceptable with this conversion. Axle upgrades are not necessary, but they may be chosen for reasons external to this transmission upgrade.

Also See

* The "Low Hood" Jeeps really don't have the clearance needed for tall Vortec V6 intake manifolds unless a 3/4" - 1" body lift is installed and air intake modifications are done. Otherwise, the Buick V6 can be considered here. 

** Big Block engines are a real kick, but rarely appropriate for any of these smaller Jeeps this side of the CJ7 & CJ8.

*** Chevrolet I6's are long and not a good fit for any short-hood Jeeps. They fit only in 1972-1986 CJ's. V6 / V8 swaps are far more common, but the Chevy I6 is an option for those who are into them.

A comparative note about predetermined bolt-in mounts vs. The Novak engine mounting system:

We at Novak receive many compliments on our engine mounts. Most customers find that it is liberating and satisfying to install their engine where they determine is the best place. 

The most prevalent complaint we receive about other companies' predetermined bolt-in mounts is the lack of freedom in placement for the varying situations each installer encounters with their Jeep. Installing an engine based on what may have been a decent location for the manufacturer's design project often presents some irritating, and otherwise easily avoidable, restrictions not present with a pair of our mounts. They offer the installer more options.

Cradle style mounts were more popular in the '60's and '70's. We used to offer one. What everyone discovered was that the engine itself makes for a crossmember on its own. Being only inches behind the factory front crossmember, cradle mounts offer nothing more than a hindrance in the engine bay. A crossmember mount is usually the result of trying to retain use of the factory frame horns that are placed precariously behind the actual mount bosses on the conversion engine, and an attempt to rebalance the situation.